Completed between October and December, the three glass cabinets display the food waste of the artist as collected from her home in Rovaniemi, Finland. Only waste produced in Flat 189 was included and so the papers do not show samples of meals out-with the home.   
       
     
 This work stands as a comment on the artist and her consumption of, and therefore relationship with, food during her 4 month stay in Finland.
       
     
 A total of 50 works were originally made. Each of the 50 has a corresponding label, which can be seen here. These labels review the artist’s choice of evening meal, though they leave out any snacks or lunches consumed within the flat. This acts as a sort of deception and therefore forces the viewer to really look at each piece and ultimately analyse its ingredients. Certain patterns can be seen in the artist’s diet from this work, such as a serious love for Mexican cuisine and tea, in all its varieties.   
       
     
 Using a basic paper making process, the artist has forced the natural materials to conform to a regimented rectangular shape. Their origins shabby, this form has allowed the waste to become something much more elegant and interesting. The artist has attempted to give value and prowess to items usually deemed rubbish. This idea is continued with the glass frames themselves (not something the viewer usually finds between themselves and decomposing vegetation) and the velvet backing the pieces lie on.   
       
     
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DSC_0955.JPG
       
     
       
     
 Completed between October and December, the three glass cabinets display the food waste of the artist as collected from her home in Rovaniemi, Finland. Only waste produced in Flat 189 was included and so the papers do not show samples of meals out-with the home.   
       
     

Completed between October and December, the three glass cabinets display the food waste of the artist as collected from her home in Rovaniemi, Finland. Only waste produced in Flat 189 was included and so the papers do not show samples of meals out-with the home.

 

 This work stands as a comment on the artist and her consumption of, and therefore relationship with, food during her 4 month stay in Finland.
       
     

This work stands as a comment on the artist and her consumption of, and therefore relationship with, food during her 4 month stay in Finland.

 A total of 50 works were originally made. Each of the 50 has a corresponding label, which can be seen here. These labels review the artist’s choice of evening meal, though they leave out any snacks or lunches consumed within the flat. This acts as a sort of deception and therefore forces the viewer to really look at each piece and ultimately analyse its ingredients. Certain patterns can be seen in the artist’s diet from this work, such as a serious love for Mexican cuisine and tea, in all its varieties.   
       
     

A total of 50 works were originally made. Each of the 50 has a corresponding label, which can be seen here. These labels review the artist’s choice of evening meal, though they leave out any snacks or lunches consumed within the flat. This acts as a sort of deception and therefore forces the viewer to really look at each piece and ultimately analyse its ingredients. Certain patterns can be seen in the artist’s diet from this work, such as a serious love for Mexican cuisine and tea, in all its varieties.

 

 Using a basic paper making process, the artist has forced the natural materials to conform to a regimented rectangular shape. Their origins shabby, this form has allowed the waste to become something much more elegant and interesting. The artist has attempted to give value and prowess to items usually deemed rubbish. This idea is continued with the glass frames themselves (not something the viewer usually finds between themselves and decomposing vegetation) and the velvet backing the pieces lie on.   
       
     

Using a basic paper making process, the artist has forced the natural materials to conform to a regimented rectangular shape. Their origins shabby, this form has allowed the waste to become something much more elegant and interesting. The artist has attempted to give value and prowess to items usually deemed rubbish. This idea is continued with the glass frames themselves (not something the viewer usually finds between themselves and decomposing vegetation) and the velvet backing the pieces lie on.

 

DSC_0957.JPG
       
     
DSC_0955.JPG
       
     
       
     
making paper from waste food

Timelapse showing the artist's process for making paper out of waste food. Includes soaking in sodium hydroxide (drain cleaner) and draining of waste, as well as the use of a homemade deckle.

Filmed on November 25th 2016 at ULapland, Finland.